Menu
1-866-290-2073
  • Maryland Treatment Facility Breakdown by Type:
  • (221) Alcohol Addiction Treatment
  • (62) Alcohol Detox
  • (11) Inpatient Hospital Treatment
  • (42) Hearing Impaired Clients
  • (242) Outpatient Alcohol Treatment
  • (50) Residential Long-Term Treatment for Alcohol Abuse
  • (116) Women
  • (9) Residential Beds for Adolescents
  • (117) DUI - DWI Offenders
  • (47) Spanish Speaking
  • (34) AIDS/HIV Clients
  • (81) Men
  • (70) Services for Young Adults
  • (103) Dual Diagnosis
  • (68) Court Appointed Client Services
  • (36) Expectant Mothers
  • (7) Mental Balance Treatment Services
  • (53) Mental Stability and Alcohol Abuse Treatment
  • (19) Residential Short-Term Treatment for Alcoholism
  • (39) Transitional Living Services
  • (14) Foreign Languages other than Spanish
  • (19) Alcohol Day Treatment Services
  • (1) American Indian and Alaska Native Languages
  • (14) Over 50
  • (8) Lesbian and Gay
  • (4) Health Services
1-866-290-2073

The statistics concerning alcoholism in Maryland are bleak, and having a wide choice of available alcohol rehab programs there is advantageous, but a person can quickly become overwhelmed in the face of the numerous amounts of alcohol rehab options. There are alcohol treatment programs in Maryland that are residential which include inpatient care, and short term programs that are often administered on an outpatient basis.

In a Maryland outpatient alcohol treatment center, the individual that is being treated for an alcohol addiction will usually visit the treatment program at various intervals for a specific number of hours. Many people from Maryland choose outpatient alcohol rehab in order to be able to remain close to home, but often times this is a recipe for disaster. Very few individuals from Maryland that have struggled with a moderate to severe alcohol addiction can benefit long term from such a limited amount of alcohol rehabilitation. In a residential alcohol rehab program, the individual from Maryland will live full time at the treatment facility; with this intense level of care, professional support is accessible around the clock.

The first step in a quality Maryland alcohol rehabilitation program is the alcohol detoxification; this process is utilized in order to safely manage and minimize physical alcohol withdrawal symptoms. After detox has successfully been completed, an individual from Maryland can then begin to focus on the other components of the alcohol treatment process; these elements of the alcohol rehabilitation can include counseling, group classes, behavior modification techniques, and relapse prevention education. The main goal of any quality alcohol rehab facility should be to enable the individual from Maryland to successfully achieve and be able to maintain long term sobriety.


Maryland alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. In Maryland, the percentage of traffic fatalities that were alcohol related peaked in 1983 and was lowest in 1996. The actual number of drunk driving deaths was highest in 1986, with 407, and reached its lowest level in 2008, with 186. In 2008, out of all traffic fatalities, 26% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the Maryland, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon a Maryland police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.) The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher.

It is important to note that the Maryland drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals in Maryland who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or bicyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value." The fatality rates shown below refer to the number of people killed in all traffic accidents and, separately, in alcohol related traffic accidents, per 100 million vehicle miles traveled.

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

640

360

56

319

50

1983

656

382

58

330

50

1984

643

344

54

285

44

1985

729

378

52

318

44

1986

784

407

52

341

43

1987

814

380

47

317

39

1988

781

352

45

290

37

1989

726

316

43

256

35

1990

707

325

46

277

39

1991

694

261

38

221

32

1992

659

243

37

208

32

1993

666

244

37

203

30

1994

651

232

36

192

30

1995

671

249

37

202

30

1996

608

213

35

179

30

1997

611

224

37

189

31

1998

606

223

37

176

29

1999

590

215

36

172

29

2000

588

240

41

194

33

2001

659

282

43

229

35

2002

661

276

42

223

34

2003

649

281

43

208

32

2004

643

286

45

231

36

2005

614

235

38

191

31

2006

651

235

36

193

30

2007

614

225

37

179

29

2008

519

186

31

152

26



2003-2004 Maryland Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

7.4%

[34th of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

12.8%

[39th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

59.1%

[19th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

4.2%

[41st of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

286

[22nd of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.511 per 10,000 people

[31st of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

45%

[8th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

51.72%

[22nd of 51]

'Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

'When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Maryland?

  • Non-commercial drivers age 21+ in Maryland are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles in Maryland are legally drunk when their blood alcohol concentration is .04 percent or greater. In Maryland, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.
  • Drivers under 21 in Maryland are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .02 or more.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Maryland

  • First-time offenders in Maryland face a term of imprisonment of up to one year, payment of a fine of up to $1,000, or both. The driver's license suspension period for a first-time offender whose BAC was .08 but less than .15 is 45 days. The suspension period for a first-time offender whose BAC was .15 or greater is 90 days.
  • A person who commits a second violation in Maryland within five years of the first offense faces a term of imprisonment of up to two years, payment of a fine of up to $2,000, or both. The driver's license suspension period for second and subsequent offenders whose BAC was .08 but less than .15 is 90 days. The suspension period for second and subsequent offenders whose BAC was .15 or greater is 180 days. A person in Maryland who commits two or more DUIs in a five-year period will be required to use an ignition interlock device for three years.
  • Those in Maryland who commit a third or subsequent offense within a five-year period face a term of imprisonment of up to three years, payment of a fine of up to $3,000, or both. These offenders will also be required to use an ignition interlock system for three years.

Ignition Interlock

In addition to other penalties associated with Maryland's DUI laws, a judge may prohibit any person convicted of DUI from operating a motor vehicle that is not equipped with an ignition interlock system for up to three years. Use of an ignition interlock system for a three-year period is mandatory for offenders in Maryland who commit two or more DUIs within a five-year period.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties associated with Maryland's DUI laws, a commercial driver who commits a first DUI while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from operating a commercial vehicle for one year. If, however, the offender was driving a commercial vehicle and transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is three years. If the driver in Maryland commits a second DUI, the driver will lose his or her commercial license for life, which may or may not be reduced to a period of 10 years.

Drivers Under 21

In addition to other penalties that may apply, a driver under 21 who is convicted of DUI in Maryland may be required to participate in Maryland's Ignition Interlock System Program for up to three years.

Illegal Sales of Alcohol to Minors and Intoxicated Persons in Maryland

It is crime to sell alcohol to a minor in Maryland. Generally, a violation of this state law subjects the offender in Maryland to a term of imprisonment of up to two years, a fine of up to $1,000, or both. Requirements for conviction, as well as penalties, may vary, however, depending on the county in which the violation occurred. Additionally, in certain Maryland counties, it is a crime to sell alcohol to visibly intoxicated persons.

  • Contact Us
  • Alcohol abuse severely suppresses the immune system, which helps protect the body from infections. Patients addicted to alcohol are more susceptible to infections such as tuberculosis, pneumonia, bacterial infections, or HIV/AIDS.
  • When an individual build a tolerance to alcohol, they must drink more and more of it in order to produce similar effects as compared to the first time that they took a drink.
  • In many European countries, beer tends to be the alcoholic drink of choice by teenagers, followed by distilled spirits over wine.
  • A mere 1-2 servings of alcohol can cause any individual to be over the "legal limit" of alcohol, meaning they would be arrested for a DUI, even if they do not feel or appear to be drunk.